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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
and thank you even for being your civil rights attorney and you are still representing people in need and i appreciate that. i know angela represents again the kind of contributions the italian community has made to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to sa
are not hatch in three days. it would take three long weeks for those eggs to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience. never give up, never to give in, to never give up, but to always keep your eyes on the prize. so across the bridge is about patients, about how, truth, love and reconciliation. now when i was growing up in rural alabama and was visiting a town of troy, visiting montgomery, visited tuskegee and later as a student in nashville, tennessee and made a living in atlanta. i saw the sign said white men, colored women, colored rating, white waiting. as a child my mother, father, grandparents said that's the way it is. don't get in the way, don't get in trouble. but in 1855 at the age of 15, i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king junior. in 1957 at the age of 17 i never said parks. the next year at the age of 18, i meant to her martin luther king junior. the action of rosa parks, people in my camera and leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way, to get in trouble. for more than 50 years have been getting in trouble, good chabot, necessary travel. [ap
a program called, who is the dean of the civil rights movement, dean of black leadership, who at the whole idea about the march on washington almost 50 years ago would say from time to time, maybe our foremothers and forefathers thought came to this great land in different shapes. but we all in the same boat now. so it doesn't matter whether we are black or white, latino, asian american or native american. it doesn't matter whether a democrat or republicans. it doesn't matter whether we are straight. it does another whether jewish or not psalm, christians, we are one people. we are one family. we are one house spirit that's what the struggle been about. [applause] this book, "across that bridge" is saying in effect they struggle is a struggle to retain the soul of america. it's not a struggled the last one day, one week, one month, one year for one lifetime. maybe we take more than one lifetime to create a more perfect union. to create the beloved community. the community at peace with itself. now you heard david tell you that i did get arrested a few times. and young people coming out chi
to that is lbj with the southern democrats passing civil rights in the '60s, which is that it was really only lbj in certain ways who could be the person to sell that vote to democrats because of where he came from. >> see, i feel like the fact that he doesn't have weight with the rest of his caucus, with the sort of -- where he needs to have it with his caucus right now is not so much ideological. i think it's a crisis of authority on the republican side. i don't think anybody, no matter where they were on the ideological number line could move republicans in a leadership role, because i don't think republicans in the house believe in following leadership anymore. anybody who is in leadership by definition is the man. they're an insurgent party. you should never go along. going along -- being part of the larger number of people doing the thing as a group marks you as suspect in the first place. i don't think anybody could hold the job. >> you know, thing is something to that culturally. the irony to that of course is newt gingrich initiated this revolution in which he changed the culture to be v
of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely shattered. i don't know how many of you have taken a trip to the coroner's office to look at the most important person in your life with five bullets in their body. let me tell you, when they lie there lifeless,
've always been passionate about politics. everyone back in my ear was. it was the height of the civil rights movement. the vietnam war and there are some issues to become engaged in and started moving up the ladder and in turn that a local on news station and that is the end of the violin. >> and then he kept working at it and loved it? >> it was not quite that simple. it was in a day when they simply did not hire women for newsroom jobs in broadcasting. there were a few anchor women and whether women. not average general assignment reporters. i could go into advertising or promotion. i was accepted in the corporate management training program. i said hire me as a copy boy. which is what they called them. this was back in the days of fell and television. it was a very different era. they gave me the midnight to 8:00 shift. if i prove myself there, maybe -- i worked my way up to becoming a reporter. i'm sure there were far more barriers for you. barriers for you.
disputes. things like the civil rights fights of the 1960s. now it is routine. it requires really 60 votes to do anything in the senate. we have this intense level of party line voting with the filibuster. it's like a parliament system without majority rule. then you have the informal analog to that in the house which the majority party says, we're not going to bring anything up. it has to have 218 votes but it has to have a majority of the majority which gives a veto to the republican wing of the conservative party. that's where we'restick stuck right now. >> let's bring in lisa dejardan. is there in this particular case -- >> reporter: i'm hesitant to get into it because it gets into senate procedure. the simplest would be if the leaders agree not to invoke that 60-vote requirement. if they agree a majority would be enough. for that to work, the rest of the senate would then have to essentially allow it to. there would have to be no one that attempts a filibuster. that's the easiest way to get around the 60 votes. another way is to possibly use some sort of budget measure that could be p
. and mostly after you passed your exams you would progress through the civil service. a very few got through the exams and said "i'm gonna drop out. "i don't want to be an administrator. "i want to go out into the landscape and right poetry. i want to paint paintings." and these were the literati, and this is the sort of thing that they did. and what's fascinating about this is we've got here, effectively, the table on which you did your scrolls. i've never noticed that. now, here we have a painting of-- i don't know whether he's-- he may be a grandfather, he may be a particular member of the literati. one can't be sure. the boys are bringing him refreshments. have you seen this? i've noticed that, yes. do you know what it is? it could be a bird or a bat or something. it's a bat! it is a bat? yeah. this boy's pointing at it because a bat in chinese is fu and fu is a homophone for "happiness." oh, right. and a red bat... ...is double happiness. oh, okay, yeah. isn't that wonderful? i mean, just a tiny little thing, and it just works. and it just gives the pi
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)